Tag Archives: music

Favorites of 2017 – Music / New Friends

26 Dec

Part 2 of my favorites list features some folks who were new to me in 2017. They aren’t necessarily novices to the music business, but until this year, I either didn’t know of them or I hadn’t listened much. That all changes now, thanks to these excellent entries.

Valerie June, The Order of Time

I looked up Valerie June after reading about her in an article featuring some of the best female guitar players, past and present. I was smitten from the get-go and “Astral Plane” is probably my very favorite song of the year.

Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors, Souvenir

For me, there is no better lyric that sums up much of my feeling of the current state of affairs in the world than Holcomb’s“I don’t know about you, but I like to tell the truth. But the truth seems to change every Tuesday.” “Wild World” is a beautiful song of hope and a reminder of the best of people. It’s the core of a special record that makes my list this year.

Justin Townes Earle, Kids in the Street

Despite the fact that he was born into singer-songwriting royalty, I had paid little attention to Justin Townes Earle until Kids in the Street this year. I’ve lost count of the number of times that I queued up this record for my morning commute. “Maybe a Moment” is one of my top 5 songs of the year and I’ll likely be listening to the younger Earle for years to come.

Caroline Spence, Spades & Roses

I discovered Caroline Spence via an article in a magazine highlighting some “up and coming” folks to seek out. I took the writer’s advice and did such, coming away with a new favorite artist, not only a new favorite record. This woman is one blessed with that gift to be able to write songs that speak well beyond her years. Spence fills a void in my listening left by the sabbatical of Kathleen Edwards these past years. I look forward to more from her in the future.

Fleet Foxes, Crack-Up

Crack-Up is a record with more production happening than I usually prefer, but after hearing a local duo cover some of Fleet Foxes’ songs one night – two guys, two guitars, acoustic music with lovely harmonies – I was intrigued and sought out them out. Crack-Up became a favorite for quiet nights at home; the kind of record you used to put on, sit back, and simply listen to.

The Suitcase Junket, Pile Driver

Each year at the music festival, Freshgrass, I come across some new artists who utterly amaze me. Matt Lorenz, aka The Suitcase Junket, was that artist this past year. His website describes him as an “artist, tinkerer, tunesmith, swamp Yankee, and one-man salvage specialist.” I got to see him perform a second time here in my hometown in a small venue that allowed me to sit right up front, taking in … golly, just the dozens of things he can do at one time. Pile Driver is energizing to listen to, particularly with the volume turned up high! 

Rayna Gellert, Workin’s Too Hard

Around Labor Day, I put together a show around the theme of work and working. Searching out some new additions, I stumbled upon Rayna Gellert. Her lyrics, her playing, her haunting voice… I was immediately drawn in. Workin’s Too Hard is a terrific collection of tunes and Gellert easily a new favorite for me.

Offa Rex, The Queen of Hearts

Not new friends, but a new combination, Offa Rex is the combined effort of the band, The Decemberists, and the English folk singer and multi-instrumentalist, Olivia Chaney. Sometimes projects that sound enticing in mind don’t quite become such in reality. Silly! This is NOT one of those. It delivers as expected and makes my list without much thought.

That’s it for this entry of my new friends and favorites. Stay tuned for some more soon, including what is likely – if I’m forced to say – my favorite record of 2017.

Favorites of 2017 – Music / The Meryl Streeps

25 Dec

Woohoo!! It’s that time of year – the time when all of the “Best of…” lists come out. Ever since I was a kid and loved listening to Casey Kasem count down the “Top 100” each New Year’s Eve (I’d studiously write down each song as he played it), I’ve enjoyed finding and reading these lists. I also enjoy making them, so let’s do it! I’ll start with music. Subsequent posts will cover books, binge-worthy television shows, movies, and more. Check back for them.

I host a radio show every-other Thursday night on WCUW, the community radio station here in Worcester, MA. It’s called, “In the Tradition” and features folk, Americana, and singer-songwriter music. These are the genres that I listen to the most and you’ll see that clearly in most of my picks, though there are a few surprises.

This isn’t a countdown. I have too hard of a time picking any one record (or book, or movie, or…) over every other one. I certainly like some more than others, but this list represents the albums that I most enjoyed in 2017. Overall. I’ll make a stab at my 5 favorites along the way, but it’s basically a “no particular order” list.

THE MERYL STREEPS

As sure as Meryl receives an Oscar nod anytime she takes the screen, there are some musicians that I love so much that all they need to do is put out a record on any given year and it will make my list. Rosanne Cash, Gillian Welch, The Beatles, and these folks:

David Rawlings, Poor David’s Almanack 

David Rawlings and Gillian Welch didn’t release a record under the “Gillian Welch” umbrella this year, but gave us another offering with David leading the vocals. It’s an instant classic and an automatic entry on my list. It’s also one of my top five of the year.

Bruce Cockburn, Bone on Bone

An artist that I have followed longer than any other, I couldn’t have been happier to have new songs from him this year. It’s been a tough year and there are few voices better for tough times than Bruce. (The “Canadian Bruce,” in this instance.)

Catie Curtis, While We’re Here

I have had the blessing of sitting under a tent, looking out over the waters of Maine, and writing snippets of songs with Catie. What can I say? She’s a treasure and this collection of very upbeat tunes is another balm for the times.

Slaid Cleaves, Ghost on the Car Radio

My absolute favorite Mainer living in Texas. A year is never complete for me unless I catch Slaid live during one of his tours homeward to New England. An amazing songwriter. One of the best. And his twang and his yodel melt my heart.

Josh Ritter, Gathering

Another fantastic wordsmith, Josh’s latest doesn’t disappoint … though, when does he ever? At least not for me. He paints beautiful images with his songs (and with his prose) and his records often get stuck on auto-repeat on my listening devices.

That’s it for the instant entries. Next up, a few that I listened to over and over and over and over again.

Old Dog, New Tricks

5 Oct

I write often in this spot about professional development, the importance of continuing to expand the skills we need to remain relevant in our work, and how curiosity plays the biggest role, in my opinion, in keeping one ever-growing and ever-learning. I thought about the topic more last night as I was driving home from an absolutely fantastic evening at the Brown University Arts Initiative. The show was a songwriting master class and performance led by Rosanne Cash and John Leventhal. (Any regular reader of this blog knows of my admiration and “awestruckness” of Rosanne, thus I won’t repeat it here.) This was the inaugural program in this new series that features accomplished musicians and songwriters to the campus to both perform and offer critique of students taking part in Brown’s Songwriting Master Class. Four incredibly talented young people played one song each, followed by thoughts and comments and suggestions from Cash and Leventhal. It was such a rich time, being able to hear individuals so proficient in something talk about their processes, offer tips that work for them, provide insights into how they chose this over that, etc. I’m grateful to Brown for starting this new program and look forward to attending future events. If you’re in the neighborhood, I encourage you to do the same.

My 45-minute drive home had me thinking about youth – and how I am far from that time in life now. I thought about those young people and some of the comments that they received from Rosanne and John. I thought about how they have a lifetime ahead of them to hone a craft, if they so choose. It started to become depressing, given that I just started writing songs about a year ago (not counting silly songs about science that borrow familiar tunes others penned). How can I ever become good at it?

But before I spent too long at my pity party, I began thinking this … 

I decided to learn to play the drums when I was in my early 30s. I loved it. Still do. When we moved to an apartment that put a cramp on my pursuits in percussion, I picked up a mandolin, found some classes, found a teacher, and got to it. I was in my 40s then. I was knocking on the door of 50 when I performed for the first time ever at an open mic. I was 50 when I joined some friends in a band. And just last year, at the ripe young age of 53, I went to my first songwriting camp and began to write my first “for real” songs. At 54, I started hosting a radio show on my local community radio station and I’m about to launch a new podcast. At 55 … well, I’m not quite there yet, so we’ll just wait and see what comes next. 

Podcast-Art-1

Reviewing this timeline in my head, I realized a few things. One, I’m a late bloomer when it comes to music. While I have always – ALWAYS – been a fan and collector and a reader of the art, I came to be a participant later in life. True, I took piano lessons for years as a kid, but it was really to justify my mom buying a piano for the house. She loved to play and had done so her whole life. Me, I was the tomboy who was happier playing ball with my older brother and his friends. But I did walk down the street to Mr. Cornett’s house each week, faithfully, for a number of years. Until I was paroled. Looking back, I needed to find music. It wasn’t going to find me.

Second, it is my nature to meander. I have now been in the same profession working at the same place longer, by far, than anything I ever did or any place I ever worked previously. It is one of my favorite professional development activities to lead, having people write down all of the jobs that they’ve ever had in life and all of the things that they subsequently know how to do because of those experiences. My lists are long. I’ve done many things, I have many interests, and I have the student loans to back it up. And I’ve come to appreciate this characteristic of myself over time. I like that I like a lot of things. I enjoy dabbling in all sorts of stuff. I used to believe that the drawback to this quality is that I’d never become very good at anything – “Jack of all trades, master of none” kind of thinking. There’s some truth to it, but it’s a choice we have to make in life. Some people choose to live all over the world while others, like my grandmother, live 94 years within the same city limits. Neither is better than the other. They are both valuable.

Which brings me to the third thing that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately as it pertains lifetime learning, professional growth, and the continuing work we do to find our place – whether professionally or personally. We can think of life in the singular or the plural. We can believe that we live one life or we can relish in living many. It’s a state of mind, I believe. I’ve surely lived more of my years already that I’ve left to live, but I’m drawn more lately to wondering about what to do with the different lives that I’ve yet to live and I like to believe that I’ve got maybe one or two left. 

What will I do with them? Maybe I’ll develop and lead more professional workshops around these things, encouraging other librarians to tap into and nurture their creative sides in their work. Maybe I’ll seek out something in the music industry that takes advantage of my skill set. Maybe radio. Maybe I’ll continue doodling data visualizations and writing reports about the cool things that happen via the UMCCTS. Who knows?

There are obstacles to thinking and living this way. We do live in a society that focuses much more on nurturing young people, those with years ahead to give to something, rather than older adults who may cost more and not give the ROI an entity seeks. It’s hard to find fellowships or internships or opportunities that allow one to learn a new profession later in life, but that said, it’s not impossible. (ProFellow is one helpful resource here.)

For me, I believe the most important thing is to remember that we don’t need to be young to either learn – or become good at – something new. It’s all in the mindset we choose to adopt. Let’s all keep growing together!

I think I’ll write a song during lunch. 

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